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In this video we will introduce the workflow used to build a basic structural trend and how this can be applied to our geological surface.

Duration

6 min

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Video Transcript

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<v Instructor>Welcome to this quick tutorial</v>

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on getting started with structural trends.

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This follows on from further guides

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and videos available on the Seequent website

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and YouTube channel,

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including our recent blog post released on June 3rd.

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Structural trends are similar to global trends

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and that they both allow for changes

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in directional continuity over a surface.

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Structural trends however,

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go one step further by allowing the user more flexibility

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on controlling the strength and direction of the trend

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at different points in space.

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It’s not often that mineralization or geological units

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behave in a consistent plaintiff fashion.

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In which case, applying a structural trends

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can be a great tool in helping to reflect this complexity.

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A structural trend can be built using any number of meshes,

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representing different trend directions.

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They can be planar or curved.

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They can be imported into Leapfrog

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or created using just about any combination of data types.

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For example, polylines, points, GIS lines,

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structural observations, et cetera.

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Currently in my 3D scene is my original surface

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without any preferred orientation defined.

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And it’s looking pretty unrealistic

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to what I know of the mineralization.

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By defining the different trend directions

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and ensuring that they are available in my meshes folder,

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I can start by right clicking structural trends,

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new structural trend.

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Under the trend type dropdown lists,

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there are three options available to us.

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Strongest along inputs, blending and non decaying.

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I’ll start with non decaying,

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which assumes that the strengths of the trend

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doesn’t decay away from the mesh.

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Click Add to select the mesh or meshes required.

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And for now I’ll leave the default strength as they are.

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We can see a visual representation of these parameters

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by viewing the structural trend object in the scene.

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Applying the default strength five, for instance,

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has created an oblate spheroid

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that is five times wider than it is thick.

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Of course, this can be adjusted as applicable.

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Using a non decaying structural trend is useful in defining

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a more or less constant trend that has influence

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across your entire model.

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Let’s go back to the structural trends objects,

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double click, and this time around,

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I’m going to select my trend type as strongest along inputs.

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Strongest along inputs allows you to create multiple trends

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that decreases in strength away from the mesh

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to a certain range.

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After the set range,

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there will be no effect from the trend.

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In this example, I will change the range to 100

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and leave the default strength parameter as five.

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Leapfrog all the process, and we can visualize the outcome.

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Using a strongest along input trend is useful in defining

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a strong, localized geological trend

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that essentially fades away from that point in space.

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Let’s go back once again,

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by double clicking our structural trend object.

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And this time selecting blending for my trend type.

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Blending will allow you to build a trend

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for multiple meshes.

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Where you can specify a range and strength for each.

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Where trends intersect,

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Leapfrog will workout to combine trend.

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So this is a useful structural type

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where two or more trends merge,

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and you want to see a smooth transition.

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Once you are happy with your structural trend

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and you want to apply it,

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then we can do so either to intrusion context surfaces

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in the geological model,

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as well as great shells in a numerical model.

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In this example,

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I’m going to apply my blended trend

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to my mineralize intrusion surface.

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Double click your surface under surface chronology

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to bring up the edit dialogue.

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Go to the surface in tab and click Additional Options

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to enable further options for editing the surface.

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From Trend select Structural Trend.

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And when you click Ok, Leapfrog Geo will warn us

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that it cannot use a linear interpolant

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with a structural trend.

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By clicking Ok, we are taken to the interpolant tab

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where we can select spheroidal instead.

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By clicking Ok, Leapfrog will regenerate

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and we can look at the outcome.

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We can compare our regenerated surface

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with what we had originally,

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and it’s looking much better than where we started.

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Thank you very much for watching this quick video.

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If you have any questions on this tutorial,

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then please feel free to reach out

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to the Seequent Support Team

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using email [email protected]